A Guide to Star Wars Saga Edition Rules to those with much more familiarity to Dungeons and Dragons 3E Rules

I happen to know that some of the folks who I talked to about playing this game are familiar with D&D 3.0/3.5, and I want this guide to mostly be for those people. If you don’t know much or anything about D&D 3.0/3.5, you might be able to skip this article safely. But if you still want to read it, you might still get something out of it.

Anyways, you’ll find a lot of rules in Star Wars Saga Edition to be familiar with D&D 3.0/3.5, but theres still a few odd differences in the rules that are really quite different.

One thing about Saga Edition is that they have the same Core Mechanic as D&D 3.0/3.5, in that what you roll to make a check is a 1d20, then add any relevant modifiers, and then compare the result to a targeted number. In the long run, Saga Edition is just that too.

One thing you might notice is the lack of AC (Armor Class) and Saving Throws. In Star Wars Saga Edition, AC is rolled into 3 different defenses, and those are: Fortitude Defense, Reflex Defense, and Will Defense. When an attack is rolled to see if it hits, the attack roll is against the Reflex Defense. If an attack is rolled to see if it has an effect on the target’s mind, the attack roll is rolled against the target’s Will Defense, and if the attack is rolled to see if it has an effect on the target’s body, the attack roll is rolled against the target’s Fortitude Defense.

So, Defenses become the new AC and Saving Throws, merged together.

You might also notice Force Points. Force Points are a thing in Star Wars Saga Edition, which are similar to the Action Point introduced in D&D as an optional rule. The difference is, with Force Points, its flavored towards using the Force. In the books, you gain more Force Points by leveling up, but if you’ve playing in my previous D&D campaign, you’ll find that I don’t like leveling up all that fast, so you’ll gain Force Points another way instead of with leveling.

Another thing is Damage Threshold. This one is brand new, and your Damage Threshold is equal to your Fortitude Defense + Size Modifiers + Miscellaneous Modifiers. When an attack deals damage to you that goes above your Damage Threshold, then you get knocked down something called the Condition Track. Usually, you get knocked one step down the condition track, but sometimes its more than that. You want your condition track to be has high up as possible.

Also, if an attack reduces you to 0 hitpoints or less and who’s damage exceeds your Damage Threshold, then you instantly die.

The condition track has 5 steps. When you are 1 step down the track, you take a -1 penalty to all Defenses, Attack Rolls, Ability Checks, and Skill checks. If you are 2 steps down the track, you take a -2 penalty to all Defenses, Attack Rolls, Ability Checks, and Skill checks. 3 steps down means a -5 penalty to all of those things. 4 steps down means a -10 penalty on all of those things, and you move at half speed. Then 5 steps down makes you helpless.

Skills are another oddity. Where in D&D 3.0/3.5, you get Skill Ranks and Skill Points, and then you invest those Skill Points into your Skills to increase your rank in them. In Saga Edition, there are no Skill Points or Skill Ranks. What you have instead are simply Skills and Skill Training. When you start the game, you start with a certain number of Skills you are trained in. Once trained, you instantly get a +5 Bonus on all skill checks related to that skill, and you can use the Trained applications of that skill too. Plus, you gain a +1 bonus in that skill for every 2 character levels you have so long as if you are trained in that skill or if the skill is usable untrained.

If you want another skill to train in, you need to take up the feat Skill Training which will allow you to be trained in another skill.

You might notice that you don’t gain any more attacks as you level up. Instead, you gain more attacks when you take them as feats, such as Double Attack and Triple Attack, or if you take up Dual Weapon Mastery.

Otherwise, the whole system is very similar to D&D 3.0/3.5, and there are still some special rules and considerations, but you’ll have to read up on those yourself in the Core Rulebook.

A Guide to Star Wars Saga Edition Rules to those with much more familiarity to Dungeons and Dragons 3E Rules

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